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Historical references to London's sounds

A database of several hundred historical descriptions and references to London's sounds. They're drawn mainly from primary sources such as autobiographies, diaries and statutes, as well as novels written around the times they depict.

 SUB-CATEGORY 1st to
10th
11th to
15th
16th to
17th
18th Early
19th
Late
19th
Early
20th
Late
20th
 Beggars, hustlers and scavengers   1 1 1   2 3 1
 Street entertainers             2  
 Costermongers and street traders   1   2 1 5 2  
 Transport for hire   1 1          
 Quack doctors       1        
 Recruitment of workers     1     1    
 Work songs and music             1  
 Workplace cries and audible signals       1 1 2 3  
 Shops and shop staff         1   3  

Period referred to: 1770

Sound category: Economic > Workplace cries and signals

Title of work: Westminster Chief Medical Officer's Report

Type of publication: History

Author: Unknown

Year of publication: 1888

Page/volume number: Unknown

The noise of street scavengers

According to Maitland there were 16 scavengers in the parish in 1770, while the payments to the raker amounted to £451. The removal of ashes and other refuse was contracted for by the Commissioners, who were empowered by Statute of 2 Wm. and Mary, 1691, cap. 8, to require the inhabitants to sweep the streets before their respective houses on every Wednesday and Saturday, and to have the refuse ready for removal by the raker, on penalty of 3s. 4d. for each neglect. The scavengers were to cause carts to be brought into all the streets every day by bell, horn, clapper, or other distinct and loud noise. Comparatively little can be gathered from the minute books of the Vestry in relation to this service, owing to the superintendence having been vested in an independent Commission.